Common Name: Iroko

Scientific Name: Miliciaexcelsa, M. regia (syn. Chlorophoraexcelsa, C. regia)

Origin: Tropical parts of Africa

Tree Size: 100-130 ft (30-40 m) tall, 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m) trunk diameter

Average Dried Weight: 41 lbs/ft3 (660 kg/m3)

 

Color & Appearance:

Iroko heartwood is mostly yellow to gold or medium brown, with color usually darkening over time. The pale yellow sapwood is obviously delineated from heartwood.

Grain & Texture:

Iroko has a medium to coarse texture, open pores,with an interlocked grain.

Endgrain:

This wood is diffuse-porous with big pores in no precise arrangement. It has solitary and radial multiples of 2-3; tylosesis common. Growth rings are indistinct; rays are visible without lens. Parenchyma is banded, paratracheal parenchyma is vasicentric, and the wood is aliform (winged, lozenge) and confluent.

Rot Resistance:

Iroko is very resilient and resistant to rot and insect attacks; it is sometimes substituted for true Teak.

Workability:

Iroko is mostly easy to work, but its interlocked grain may cause some tearout during surfacing processes. In addition, deposits of calcium carbonate are at times present, which can have a substantial dulling effect on cutters. Iroko finishes and glues nicely.

Odor:

Iroko has no characteristic odor.

Alergies & Toxicity:

Even though severe reactions are very uncommon, Iroko has been reported to be a sensitizer. Most common reactions include eye, skin, and respiratory irritations. Iroko can cause additional health problems in sensitive persons, including asthma-like symptoms, boils, or hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

Pricing & Availability:

Iroko is imported at a moderate price. Veneer is often for sale and is inexpensively priced.

Sustainability:

This species is not listed in the CITES Appendices; however, Iroko is on the IUCN Red List. It is listed as vulnerable becauseof population reduction over 20% in the previous three generations, which is caused by decline in the wood’s natural range and by exploitation.

Common Uses:

Iroko is used for flooring, cabinetry, veneer, furniture, boat building, turned objects, and smaller specialty wood items.

Comments:

Because of the high price of genuine Teak, Iroko may be considered a lower-cost alternative. This wood is stable and durable, with an overall appearance that resembles Teak.

Size 1-200 Bft 201-300 Bft 301-500 Bft 501+ Bft
4/4 8 7 6.50 6
5/4
6/4
8/4 9 8 7.50 7